The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Medicaid Losers! Doesn't Have To Be You



Does your state governor or state legislature respect your vote?  Do they show any degree of compassion for the elderly and poor who stand to gain from Medicaid Expansion. If you answered "no" to either of the question have a history or inclination to vote GOP, you are showing signs of Albert Einstein's....



You do not have to live as a Medicaid Expansion "loser." 

 

But, the Medicaid Expansion landscape changed over time.

Medicaid Expansion status 2014.....

Status of state Medicaid expansion decisions as of 2014. (Pew Charitable Trusts)

The Center for Budget ad Policy Priorities (CBPP) w/permission

States’ Very Good Deal on Expanding Medicaid Gets Even Better
April 22, 2014 at 3:51 pm


In a little-noticed finding in last week’s Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report on health reform, CBO sharply lowered its estimates of how much the Medicaid expansion will cost states. We’ve noted repeatedly that the federal government will cover the large bulk of the expansion’s cost. As our new report explains, these new figures make it even clearer that the expansion is a great deal for states.


  • CBO now estimates that the federal government will, on average, pick up more than 95 percent of the total cost of the Medicaid expansion and other health reform-related costs in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) over the next ten years (2015-2024).
  • States will spend only 1.6 percent more on Medicaid and CHIP due to health reform than they would have spent without health reform (see chart). That’s about one-third less than CBO projected in February.

Moreover, the 1.6 percent figure doesn’t reflect states’ savings in providing health care for the uninsured, many of whom will now have Medicaid coverage. The Urban Institute has estimated that if all states took the Medicaid expansion, states would save between $26 billion and $52 billion from 2014 through 2019 in reduced spending on hospital care and other services provided to the uninsured.

Related Posts:
The Federal Financial Commitment to the Medicaid Expansion Stands
More Evidence That Medicaid Expansion Makes Fiscal Sense for States
The Growing State Cost of Not Expanding Medicaid

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