The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.

Monday, November 3, 2014

Lucy Burns, "Night of Terror" And Your Vote




You may not know her. Her name was Lucy Burns, pictured here. Her crime? Asking for the right to vote. During what was called the "Night of Terror" in 1917, women who were picketing the White House were beaten and sent to a workhouse prison for 60 days.
This prison was known for its cruelty, where bedding was only washed once a year, prisoners had to use the same soap and drink from a pail, they were fed gruel with worms floating on top, and they were made to strip naked andmarch across an open area to the shower.
When the women began protesting with a hunger strike and with the potential of having dead prisoners on their hands, the guards dangerously force-fed the women, holding them down.
Lucy Burns was kicked, beaten, choked, and dragged by the guards. They chained her hands to the bars of her cell, with her hands were above her head, left bleeding and gasping for her breath. This abuse continued for several weeks.
The unfair and violent treatment of the women gained the attention of the media, and their voice was finally heard. The 19th amendment would be passed, and finally ratified on August 18, 1920.
If not for the courage of women like Lucy Burns and the other women who suffered through the Night of Terror and other incidents, women may not have been heard and given the right to vote.

You may not know her. Her name was Lucy Burns, pictured here. Her crime? Asking for the right to vote. During what was called the "Night of Terror" in 1917, women who were picketing the White House were beaten and sent to a workhouse prison for 60 days.

This prison was known for its cruelty, where bedding was only washed once a year, prisoners had to use the same soap and drink from a pail, they were fed gruel with worms floating on top, and they were made to strip naked and march across an open area to the shower.

When the women began protesting with a hunger strike and with the potential of having dead prisoners on their hands, the guards dangerously force-fed the women, holding them down.

Lucy Burns was kicked, beaten, choked, and dragged by the guards. They chained her hands to the bars of her cell, with her hands were above her head, left bleeding and gasping for her breath. This abuse continued for several weeks.

The unfair and violent treatment of the women gained the attention of the media, and their voice was finally heard. The 19th amendment would be passed, and finally ratified on August 18, 1920.

If not for the courage of women like Lucy Burns and the other women who suffered through the Night of Terror and other incidents, women may not have been heard and given the right to vote.

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