The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Flag Of The US Confederate States And Your Paradigm A Cause For Personal Reflection




If you are a person who finds an iota of sympathy for people who want to continue flying the Flag of the Confederate States of America think deep and think carefully about your social paradigm. You are an enabler without regard for its deep core message of defiance to the greater society, direct oppressive imagery of slavery and anti-civil rights messages it delivers with each observance.

We are going to dig into the origins of the flag starting with a Facebook video posted by Friend of the TPI and developer of The Whirling WindBenjamin T Moore Jr.  We visited with WIKI for additional information that appears very credible and is well documented via attribution and citations. 

First, a reminder of the possibility your social paradigm is detrimental to the greater society.
  

True physical evolution of the Confederate Flag.


The rectangular battle
flag of the Army of Tennessee
The current physical manifestation of the flag evolved from the first 1861 "Stars and Bars" configuration (see right sidebar) of the Flag of the Confederacy through the the adaptation that has lingered in the southern psyche, the rectangular battle flag of the Tennessee Army. 

Wiki Flags of the Confederate States Of America

First national flag: "The Stars and Bars" (1861–1863)


A Confederate "Stars and Bars" flag, captured by soldiers of the Union Army at Columbia, South Carolina.

Three versions of the flag of the Confederate States of America and the Confederate Battle Flag are shown on this printed poster from 1896. The "Stars and Bars" can be seen in the upper left. Standing at the center are Stonewall Jackson, P. G. T. Beauregard, and Robert E. Lee, surrounded by bust portraits of Jefferson DavisAlexander Stephens, and various Confederate army officers, such as James Longstreet and A. P. Hill.
The first official national flag of the Confederacy, often called the "Stars and Bars", was flown from March 4, 1861 to May 1, 1863. It was designed by German/Prussian artist Nicola Marschall in Marion, Alabama and resembles the Flag of the Austrian Empire (later Austria-Hungary, now the Republic of Austria), with which Marschall would have been familiar.[12][13]The "Stars and Bars" flag was adopted March 4, 1861, in the first temporary national capital of Montgomery, Alabama, and raised over the dome of that first Confederate capitol. Marschall also designed the Confederate army uniform.[13]


Confederate States of America
Flag of the Confederate States of America (1861-1863).svg
The fourth variant of the first Confederate National Flag
Name"The Stars and Bars"
UseNational flag Design used in the past, but now abandoned
AdoptedMarch 4, 1861 (first 7-star version)
November 28, 1861 (final 13-star version)
DesignThree horizontal stripes of equal height, alternating red and white, with a blue square two-thirds the height of the flag as the canton. Inside the canton are white five-pointed stars of equal size, arranged in a circle and pointing outward.
Designed byNicola Marschall
Second flag of the Confederate States of America
The second national flag of the Confederate States of America.
Name"The Stainless Banner"[a]
UseNational flag Design used in the past, but now abandoned
Proportion1:2[b]
AdoptedMay 1, 1863
DesignA white rectangle two times as wide as it is tall, a red quadrilateral in the canton, inside the canton is a blue saltire with white outlining, with thirteen white five-pointed stars of equal size inside the saltire.
Designed byWilliam T. Thompson[c][2][3][5][6][7][8]
Third flag of the Confederate States of America
The third national flag of the Confederate States of America.
Name"The Blood-Stained Banner"
UseNational flag Design used in the past, but now abandoned
Proportion2:3
AdoptedMarch 4, 1865
DesignA white rectangle, one-and-a-half times as wide as it is tall a red vertical stipe on the far right of the rectangle, a red quadrilateral in the canton, inside the canton is a blue saltire with white outlining, with thirteen white five-pointed stars of equal size inside the saltire.[d]
Designed byArthur L. Rogers[11]

You might ask why the claims of a racist moniker, So far there is nothing on which to indict the flag as a symbol of racial hatred and white supremacy. As depicted in the video above, the current version of the flag which is basically the Tennessee Army version appears to have been a direct descendant of a version of the flag created by William Tappen Thompson and William Ross Powell.


William Tappan Thompson
William Tappan Thompson (1).jpg
BornWilliam Tappan Thompson[1]
August 31, 1812[1]
Ravenna, Ohio, U.S.[1]
DiedMarch 24, 1882 (aged 69)[1]
Savannah, Georgia, U.S.[1]
ResidenceSavannah, Georgia, U.S.[1]
NationalityAmerican (1812–1861)
Confederate (1861–1865)
OccupationWriter, editor[1]
OrganizationSavannah Daily Morning News[1]
Known forHelping to design the second Confederate national flag


Wiki excerpt

The flag is also known as "the Stainless Banner" and was designed by William T. Thompson, a newspaper editor and writer based in Savannah, Georgia, with assistance from William Ross Postell, a Confederate blockade runner.[2][3][5][6][7][8] The nickname "stainless" referred to the pure white field which took up a large part of the flag's design, although W.T. Thompson, the flag's designer, referred to his design as "The White Man's Flag".[2][3][4][5][6][7][8] In referring to the white field that comprised a large part of the flag's design elements, Thompson stated that its color symbolized the "supremacy of the white man":[1]

Second national flag
(May 1, 1863 – March 4, 1865[17]), 2:1 ratio
Second national flag, also used as the Confederate navy's ensign, 1.5:1 ratio
As a people we are fighting maintain the Heaven-ordained supremacy of the white man over the inferior or colored race; a white flag would thus be emblematical of our cause.
William T. Thompson (April 23, 1863), Daily Morning News[2][3][4][5][6][7][8]
If you have read this far into the piece, you should vest the Wiki link for a deeper perspective on Thompson and Powell's commitment to the flag as a moniker of white supremacy. 

Additional WIKI.....
He praised his design as symbolizing the Confederacy's ideology and its cause of "a superior race", as well as for bearing little resemblance to the U.S. flag, which he called the "infamous banner of the Yankee vandals". Writing for Savannah's Daily Morning News, Thompson stated:
As a national emblem, it is significant of our higher cause, the cause of a superior race, and a higher civilization contending against ignorance, infidelity, and barbarism. Another merit in the new flag is, that it bears no resemblance to the now infamous banner of the Yankee vandals.
William T. Thompson (May 4, 1863), Daily Morning News[2][3][5][6][7][8]
Read More here

If you visited the link, you know that from Thompson's version of the flag and much debate about its visual impact and messaging, the Second Confederate Navy took the platform as the version of choice and lingering reminders of oppression, human bondage and civil war.
The Second Confederate Navy Jack, 1863–1865

We will leave this piece with the quote from William Tappan Thompson posted above :

"As a national emblem, it is significant of our higher cause, the cause of a superior race, and a higher civilization contending against ignorance, infidelity, and barbarism. Another merit in the new flag is, that it bears no resemblance to the now infamous banner of the Yankee vandals."
Should you seek to check your paradigm, or are you OK?

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