The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.

Friday, September 4, 2015

Jon S. Randal: A Story of Civil Rights And Humanism

Larger Version


If you take a look at the image posted by Friend of the TPI, Jon S. Randal, and read his September 4th reflection on US History and the quest for Civil Rights, you may experience a warmed heart and quite probably a social epiphany.

"Don't let them see you cry." 

Jon S. Randal's photo.
On September 4, 1957, 15-year-old Elizabeth Eckford attempted to attend classes at Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas, which had become integrated following the results of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. As she tried to enter the school, soldiers of the National Guard, under orders from the Arkansas Governor, would step in her way to prevent her from entering. An angry mob of about 400 surrounded the school and soon started following Eckford, cursing and spitting at her, threatening to lynch her. She eventually gave up and ran to a nearby bus stop, she couldn't stop crying. A reporter, Benjamin Fine, having in mind his own 15-year-old daughter, sat down next to Eckford and tried to comfort her telling her, "don't let them see you cry."



































The story of Elizabeth Eckford and Helen Bryan passed into US History in a manner not often observed nor experienced in our times.  

The piece linked below was published here on August 19th post. 

The short story? 

Bryan later in life sought-out Elizabeth Eckford and the fairy tale ending found them friends for life.  It is an intriguing story with many sidebars. 

Herewith is the piece we published on August 29, 2015.


Life Reflections Of A Southern Hater (Elizabeth Eckford And Hazel Bryan-Massery)



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