The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Dove Soap Brand Joins In Perpetuating Growing Racism



Image result for racist ads 2017

Dove Soap, a Unilever brand, joins a growing list of entities which have taken actions (via an advertisement) to return the United United States to a state of racism like that of the 1800s through the mid-1960s. 

Dove's Unilever USA web page excerpts
 
... Dove is committed to helping all women realize their personal beauty potential by creating products that deliver real care. Dove believes that beauty should be for everyone, because when you look and feel your best, you feel better about yourself.
Our mission

Dove® is rooted in listening to women. The Campaign for Real Beauty was launched in 2004 after a major global study – The Real Truth About Beauty - revealed that only 2% of women around the world would describe themselves as beautiful. This sparked a global conversation about the need for a wider definition of beauty. 

New Dove global research reveals that beauty anxiety persists among women and girls. Most women are unable to recognize their own beauty, which can greatly impact their self-esteem and confidence. Only 4% of women around the world currently consider themselves beautiful. Further, when girls feel bad about their looks more than 60% (age 15 to 17) avoid normal daily activities such as attending school, going to the doctor, or even giving their opinion. 

In response, Dove evolved the campaign and launched the Dove Self-Esteem Project in 2006 to help ensure the next generation of women grow up to be free from misconstrued beauty stereotypes and the burden of self-doubt. Together with experts and key partners (in the U.S., Dove supports the work of the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., Girls, Inc., and Boys & Girls Clubs of America) Dove has created self-esteem building educational programs and activities that encourage, inspire and motivate girls around the world to reach their full potential. 

We have reached more than 19 million girls so far with this programming. Together, our efforts have moved the needle in a positive direction. But there is more to be done.
Peruse the following Dove Facebook image very closely.



If you continue to feel that the US is a post-racial nation which socially moved from the 1950s, you are either naive or you simply refuse to accept reality.

Racism isn't only manifest via preferential hiring which is a conduit to such an ad. It isn't solely the domain of growing numbers of white supremacist, Nazis, and so-called white nationalists and it certainly isn't restricted to people working to deny access for people of color. It spans the social gamut from inert bias through over examples of utter racism as depicted in the Dove ad.  Diverse staffing and promotion could serve as first-line barriers to such ads.

The ad exemplifies how racism works (in organizations which refuse to hire people of color or when people of color are hired many (too many) rarely earn promotions which place them in positions to view ads as the one pictured above.

How is the Dove advertisement any different than ads from an era when racism was commonplace and probably considered humorous?

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people sitting and text  Image may contain: one or more people 

Image result for pears soap racist ads Image result for pears soap racist ads

Related image

There is no difference. Actually, there is a difference.  The Dove advertisement was developed and posted to Facebook in 2017.

The advertisement also exemplifies the level of white nationalism and utter racism which accompanies other examples of overt racism which seems to proliferate over the past nine years.

Let's revisit the Dove web page verbiage for a bit:
...helping all women realize their persoal beauty potential by creating products that deliver real care. 
... Most women are unable to recognize their own beauty, which can greatly impact their self-esteem and confidence. Only 4% of women around the world currently consider themselves beautiful. Further, when girls feel bad about their looks more than 60% (age 15 to 17) avoid normal daily activities such as attending school, going to the doctor, or even giving their 

opinion.
... Dove has created self-esteem building educational programs and activities that encourage, inspire and motivate girls around the world to reach their full potential.
Really Dove?

It should be noted, Dove has issued an apology for the advertisement. 

An apology is OK, but when Dove has reached into the racist bucket before, the nascent apology seems perfunctory.


Really Dove?

Actually the Dove advertisement is a modern day manifestation of national institutional racism practiced since the advent of radio and TV.  The following three minute video adroitly captures and addresses the roots of the Dove mindset.

Well, the video actually is a great response to Dove, while created for a purpose well outside the scope of the company's advertisement campaign.







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