The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.
Showing posts with label American genocide. Show all posts
Showing posts with label American genocide. Show all posts

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Prose From An American Genocide

POIGNANT and time proven resilience.  On the day before US History was tragically archived at the Little Bighorn (in 1876), we post evidence of a strong desire for a people to be left alone and free to avoid life on a reservation.  


Native American - Honoring our Ancestors, Culture & SpiritualityIf the white man wants to live in peace with the Indian, he can live in peace...
Treat all men alike. 
Give them all the same law. 
Give them all an even chance
to live and grow. All men were made by
the same Great Spirit Chief. 
They are all brothers. 
The Earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it....
Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers,free to think and talk and act for myself, and I will obey every law, or submit to the penalty.
Heinmot Tooyalaket ( Chief Joseph), Nez Perce Leader
If the white man wants to live in peace with the Indian, he can live in peace...
Treat all men alike. Give them all the
same law. Give them all an even chance
to live and grow.All men were made by
the same Great Spirit Chief.
They are all brothers. The Earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it....
Let me be a free man,free to travel,
free to stop,free to work,free to trade where I choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers,free to think and talk and act for myself, and I will obey every law, or submit to the penalty.

Heinmot Tooyalaket ( Chief Joseph), Nez Perce Leader
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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Native American - Honoring our Ancestors, Culture & Spirituality's





The screed following our introduction is available via special permission from the Native American - Honoring our Ancestors, Culture & Spirituality's Facebook page. A page that I will wager not many Americans visit.  We do not visit such places for various reasons, all of which are losses to ourselves via information deprivation. Of course, we do not visit, we are not First Nation People.  How sad!  We are not actors, celebrities or professional athletes, but we damned certain follow them as if they are human magnets and idols for materialist worship.

We are "avoiders".

One major reason for avoiding such repositories of history, is the dissonance that flows through the mind when we see the horrible images. The horrors of the written words. The horrors of our past invade our  'comfortable' and delusional psyches.  We do not like to think about a past that was manifest genocide of a people: First Nation Natives North Americans.  The "avoiders" do not like being reminded of African slavery in North and Southern America.  The very thought of Japanese (or Asian) internment camps in WW II, is a topic to avoid. And, most have no idea the horrors of discrimination reaped upon Italian immigrants. Ah, Italian Immigrants...a people who could assimilate via skin color far more readily than people blessed with deeper levels of melanin or skin pigmentation.

The Progressive Influence's December, 29 commemoration of the Wounded Knee Massacre (1890) was as critical as any and all Martin Luther King, Jr commemorations three weeks later.  We commemorate just as we do the Holocaust, Memorial Day (AKA Decoration Day (see Early History), and the honoring of 9/11 dead in September of each year.  

We post not in angst against those who gave us a 'soiled' and tragic past, we post for sake of honor, remembrance, and with an eye towards the future.

We do not forget!

"The ground on which we stand is sacred ground. It is the blood of our ancestors."


Chief Plenty Coups (Crow)



"How smooth must be the language of the whites, when they can make right look like wrong, and wrong like right."


Black Hawk (Sauk)
 "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."
 George Santayana (Non- First Nation) 
_________________________
(Black and white images below added by The Pardu of The Progressive Influence)
Actual tiny handcuffs used by the U.S. government on Native American children to drag them away from their families and send them to boarding schools where their heritage was stripped from them.

Haskell’s Cultural Center & Museum, located on campus, tells the full—and often cruel—story of Haskell’s painful past as well as providing a venue to showcase Native art, culture from the past and present. Opened in 2002, the center features the permanent exhibit Honoring Our Children Through Seasons of Sacrifice, Survival, Change and Celebration, featuring artifacts, photos and letters from the school’s early days. 
Among the artifacts currently on display is a heavy lock and key from the small on site jail used to punish unruly students. Soon, perhaps, the handcuffs will be included among these artifacts, adding its chilling testimony regarding the practices used by early educators to kill the Indian and save the child.
Not much is known about the diminutive handcuffs, which were donated to the Cultural Center in 1989 by a non-Indian man who described their use to Bobbi Rahder, former director of the Haskell Cultural Center & Museum. “He told us they were used to restrain captured Indian children who were being taken to boarding schools,” says Rahder. The middle-age white man said his father had the handcuffs for years but that he no longer wanted to have them in his possession. “He seemed relieved to get rid of them,” Rahder recalls.
I made many phone calls, but was unable to track down the man, who is said to have lived in Lawrence. According to Rahder, he failed to respond to messages they had left him over the years, and he has not been seen at Haskell since the day he brought the handcuffs to the Cultural Center. “It was all very vague. He didn’t tell us how his father came to have the handcuffs. He just showed up one day and donated them to the Center."
Mysterious donations are common at the Cultural Center. The handcuffs, however, were much different, “I was shocked and afraid to touch them."A number of elders and leaders, conducted a modest ceremony the next day at the school’s medicine fire. Women from the Creek and Choctaw Nations, provided a tiny handmade quilt in which the handcuffs were reverently wrapped before being stored in the Cultural Center’s archives. The handcuffs remained in storage for more than 20 years.
Although the Cultural Center displays a number of artifacts related to the harsh treatment of early Indian students at Haskell, the handcuffs were simply too painful to be addressed. Elders blessed the handcuffs and were further advised to put them away. The handcuffs languished in the archives of the center until this past summer.
As word of the handcuffs began to leak out over the past few years, students and faculty began discussing the importance of acknowledging their existence and putting them on display. For whatever reason, no one at the school has been willing to take the lead in the handling of this powerful artifact, but with the approval of Haskell administration, it was agreed to unwrap them for ICTMN.
The tiny handcuffs are a tangible example of the painful history between Native people and the U.S. “The history of our genocide has been so swept under the rug by the mainstream. People need to see the impact that these policies had on us,“ she  says. “If those handcuffs could talk, they would tell some terrible stories,” she says.
Steve Prue, spokesman for Haskell, says there are no immediate plans regarding how the handcuffs will be presented to the public, nor how they will be displayed. He agrees with students that the handcuffs are an appropriate item to be included in displays of other Haskell artifacts at the Cultural Center. “It’s good to have these sorts of things on display in the Cultural Center,” he says. “They tell the real story of who truly paid the price for us to be here today.” There is no doubt, to any compassionate reader of this horrid and unspeakable history, as to who were the real savages were.

Actual tiny handcuffs used by the U.S. government on Native American children to drag them away from their families and send them to boarding schools where their heritage was stripped from them.

See more after Break below

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