The Pardu

The Pardu
Watchful eyes and ears feed the brain, thus nourishing the brain cells.
Showing posts with label Nash & Young. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nash & Young. Show all posts

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Woodstock: On The Day Woodstock Closed.. 45 Years Past


Woodstock 1969: All the Performers, All the Songs

woodstock event poster
This weekend marks the 45th anniversary of Woodstock, known originally as The Woodstock Music and Art Fair 1969.
Much has been written about Woodstock’s place in history. I would like to add a personal note about how Woodstock has influenced me.
I was 12 years old in 1969. No, I was not in attendance at the time. Heck, I didn’t even know it was going on until afterward. Popular music was a big part of my life in ’69, but my access to music was limited to AM Top 40 radio – namely, WHB out of Kansas City. If they didn’t play it on Top 40 radio, I didn’t know about it. This was long before radio stations split the programming formats up according to music genre; Top 40 included almost everything that wasn’t considered country. We didn’t have radio stations that targeted specific audiences like we do today. That is of course, unless you wanted to hear all country music all the time or all talk radio all the time, then AM Top 40 was what you were left with. FM radio, at least in rural areas such as mine, was reserved for local programming.
When we bought pre-recorded music in the late 60′s, we usually picked up the 45-rpm single. The record stores where I purchased them devoted almost all of their space to 45s. There were a few LPs, but they didn’t get the shelve space that 45s got. Sure we bought albums, but we only bought the ones we thought we’d like based on the album cuts that had been released as singles and received play on AM Top 40 radio. This meant most of the albums we owned were greatest hits collections of our favorite Top 40 artists. Now, we were aware that a separate culture existed for album rock, but we didn’t have access to it; if it wasn’t Top 40, we generally didn’t know about it. I did get my first taste of album rock during ’69 when I was able to pick up Beaker Street out of Little Rock – an AM radio program that we could often get late at night in northern Missouri – but this was only a small taste of what was going on outside the world of top 40. In the day, this was called underground music.
When Woodstock came along though, this was when things changed. That first album of highlights from the show, the second album, and the film, all introduced me to a new world of music – popular and talented performers whom I had not heard of and in many cases had not heard at all. It was all phenomenal music that hadn’t been released on 45s, and therefore didn’t play on a top 40 radio station.
We were opened up to a whole new world of music, one that was politically motivated, and that we hadn’t heard before because it wouldn’t have passed the discriminating ear of the Top 40′s censors. Read more after break below
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